Archive for August, 2010

Walter’s On Washington

Walter’s is one of Houston’s oldest venues and a blessing that we still have around. Walter’s is a beacon amongst a sea of of the now gentrified  Washington Strip. Hosting may Houston local acts and many touring acts Walter’s has opened its doors to everyone and of all ages.

4215 Washington Houston, TX 77008  713-862-2513

http://www.4215washington.com/

 

Boondocks

A must stop location nestled in along the Montrose Bar hoping trail, Boondock’s has quickly become a place to check out offering a huge variety of live performances from  Dj’s to local hero Little Joe Washington.

1417 Westheimer Houston, TX 77006  713-522-8500

http://www.myspace.com/boondocksbar

 

Interview with Houston rapper Kyle Hubbard

Where do your roots lie in the Hip Hop and Rap scene?

I was born and raised in Houston, but I would be lying if I said the music that has come out of here is what inspires my own songs. This is not to say that I dislike what Houston has produced, because the truth is I love it, but when I first started to become aware of hip-hop music it was acts from the east coast that I first fell in love with. I would have to say my music is rooted in the gritty melodies and rugged drums that defined the east coast sound.

What are your thoughts on upcoming Houston and regional rappers?

I know I am biased, but I honestly feel that the up and coming talent in Houston’s hip hop scene is overwhelming and I feel like our city is poised to be the Mecca for the new generation of original and new rappers. Our city has guys like Roosh Williams, DZA, The Krunkquistadors, Fat Tony, B L A C K I E, V-Zilla, Stockz and myself just to name a few. All of these artists are beyond talented and I feel like they could not only hold their own on a major national stage, but they would excel at it and become a light of inspiration for up and comers all over the nation, not just in the H. Another thing that I think is super dope about the talent in Houston is the diversity. If you need some tunes to blaze up to you got Roosh Williams, if you need some gritty ass street shit you got DZA, if want something to fuck some shit up to you got B L A C K I E and so forth and so on. If hip-hop were a high school then Houston would be the gifted and talented class.

You have an outstanding amount of hits on your myspace profile. What sort of marketing methods have you used to promote yourself and spread your music effectively?

Through many years of trial and error I have found the most effective thing I can do to market myself is to be straight with people and restrain from creating some sort of character or gimmick I have to shove down their throats. I respect the shit out of my fans and I know these people are intelligent, so I treat them as such. Everybody and their mom have a rap career and I think one of the methods that have helped me to stand out is how painfully average and normal I am. With a lot of rappers, people know their little story and shit more than the actual music, I feel like the songs some artist create are just a byproduct of the character they (or a label) created and I hate that. My name is Kyle Hubbard, I am a white kid from the suburbs, and I’d like to rap some songs for you, period.

What is your artistic method? By that I mean, do you write first, or do you create beats first? Is there anything that stands out that makes the song writing process easier?

Every song starts with an idea, just a broad and undefined concept. At that point I consider a specific demographic that I am trying to appeal to with that particular song and tweak the original concept until it becomes something that I feel that particular demographic will respond to. Before I ever write any lyrics I come up with a song title, although more times than not the final song title will change but this step helps me keep my thoughts centralized and focused because I know exactly what I am aiming for. When choosing beats I like to treat the song titles as if they were the name of a movie and I look for an instrumental that I could see the director of that movie using as the theme song, to sum up his story. Once the beat his in place the writing begins, 9 times out of 10 I will write my verses and lay those down in the studio and go back and focus on the hooks after the majority of the song is finished. My process for writing verses and hooks are two completely different beasts and require radically different mindsets so I tend to separate these parts into two days as to not interfere with one another. Sometimes the process is quick and painless and other times its torture and it’s got me loosing sleep. When it’s the latter the only thing that’s going to get me through it is a little Mary Jane.

I didn’t see any mention of you having toured. Has your success be primarily regional? Do you have plans of touring in the future?

To be completely honest I feel like I have yet to hit my stride in live performances. At this point, I refuse to do any big shows without live musicians playing with me. I do a lot of shows with my band The Krunkquistadors and when I get on stage with them I am going up there with a DJ, a drummer, and a guitarist (all beyond talented dudes, WADDUP!) and needless to say that has spoiled me. I have recently linked up with Space City Records to put out my second full-length album and because I have become a part of that family I have endless resources. Once the time comes to start doing shows for that album I will be ready to go with a live band, and believe you me that shit will be beyond dope. My success has been primarily local but at the beginning of this year I linked up with DJ Vlad to host my debut mix tape “Who Do You Believe In?”. Vlad has a lot of clout in the hip-hop world and he is a national figure and his contribution to that project turned out to be extremely helpful in getting me exposure outside of Houston.

The Krunkquistadors are dropping a brand new album this summer and on the solo side of things I will be releasing “The Neon Summer 2” which will be available for free download come August.

Kyle Hubbard :: Waddup

Check out Kyle Hubbard’s Music here.

 

New Music from Baby Showers – Jay from Woozyhelmet’s secret suprise CD Release

New Band in Houston! Baby Showers playing at Paperstamp Record's 24hr recording series. Photos courtesy of Pam Cantu pamcantu.com

Jay of Woozyhelmet rehearsed/recorded for the first time with newly formed super band, Baby Showers, tonight at the IH Headquarters with Paper Stamp Records and friends. And guess What? There EP Release is coming out the next day!  Super Group Members include Joe Mathlete – The Mathletes, Jaime Nava – Giant Princess, Andrew Lee - The Wild Moccasins, Brett Taylor – Sings, Cameron of Ghormeh Sabzi Pam Cantu The Piano Vines
There music is about having fun, getting drunk, and having more fun. Is it accessible for the general masses or music enthusiast? Who really cares. Rock n roll doesn’t really make me want to care about my dayjob, nor long for epic meaning of it all. I see this band at live shows and there music makes me want to get off my ass and dance.

Dance with them tonight at Mango’s 7pm $8. They are playing with So Many Dynamos (on tour with Cast Spells) July 22nd 7pm

Paper Stamp Recording: Baby Showers – Barriers

Paper Stamp Recording: Baby Showers – Woman

Paper Stamp Recording: Baby Showers – Elaine

Paper Stamp Recording: Baby Showers – Parts

Paper Stamp Recording: Baby Showers – Lets Get These Hipsters Dancing

 

Free Press Interview with Indie Houston

Screen Shot 2012-12-12 at 2.42.10 PM
Interview with Free Press Houston

-conducted by Ramon Medina

The McKenzies, Paris Falls, and Giant Princess are playing a show this weekend that benefits Indiehouston.org. I got a little curious as to what IH was all about so I contacted IH’s Robert Delossantos to find out.

FPH: So, the show looks pretty great this weekend. That got me wondering – what’s Indie Houston?

Robert: This is basically a first of many shows that we want to put together. Indiehouston.org is an organization me and a friend are attempting to create to promote local artists around Houston. I want to get as many creative people as possible to promote shows.

FPH: Well, how do you plan on doing this?

Robert: Starting out, I knew that this would need multiple heads on this. What I want to do is get as many people to promote this scene we have and we’re recruiting more and more people everyday to help promote a lot of different things. There are so many people -talented people that want to contribute something to this city, but they don’t really know how or have any direction – graphic designers, musicians, artist, theater kids…

I have been a fan of most of these local artists since The Groceries and Impossibles reigned at Fitz. I go to a lot of shows, I see a lot of really die hard fans – I’m one of them – and I think the problem is we need to get in touch with more of those 3 million people in Houston. We’re so scattered everywhere and many people don’t even know what the Free Press is. I talked to this girl the other day – she’s someone I respect with a really good head on her shoulders – but she told me when I invited her to this show “Oh I don’t listen to anything that’s not mainstream.” What? A lot of people in Houston have that mentality or maybe just haven’t been properly exposed.

FPH: Why do 3 million people matter?

Robert: Because the bands and the artists matter. Because I want to see those bands tour. Because I want to see that glory at the end of the tunnel for the Wild Moccasins and the McKenzies. I don’t want them to quit in 4 years because they have to pay rent.

I believe that if people in the 200 range or more show up [to shows] then we’d see more venues and we’d see more bands following them. I’m not saying that indiehouston.org is going to revolutionize Houston’s local artists but I do believe that we can help improve the sort of participation in the community.

For instance, I bought a camera recently. We just met a photographer who would love to go with us to shows and take pictures -he’s using our camera now. All he wants is something interesting to work on. A graphic designer wants to make fliers for as many projects that we give him. A film maker will maybe want to record a music video.

FPH: So are you trying to be the meeting point for all these people?

Robert:We do, and I aim to push that as far as I can. Indiehouston.org is already getting bands contacting us from around the nation. They don’t know who to contact to book a show. I know a name like indiehouston.org will let another really good band know he’s not going to end up on 45 and Tidwell if he wants to book a show.

What I want to do is bring a lot of different talents together and put on really good shows around Houston – turning a place like Late Nite Pie, who has never really put on a show before, into one more place we can go to see something great.

FPH: Let’s say I’m a band and I want to join. What’s expected of me and what should I expect of y’all?

Robert: That we’re going to actually promote the show in every way possible. Of course, I expect the bands to do all they can to promote the show but I don’t expect them to think they are alone in this. Bust your ass for your show but work together with everyone that you can. Free press does a great job. Skyline – hell yeah. Space City Rock – of course. Let’s welcome indiehouston.org; maybe we can help too

 

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